A great wide angle lens is an essential for your toolkit, especially if you enjoy taking landscape photography. There are a ton of different options out there, so we put together this list to help you find the best wide angle lens for Canon cameras.

Wide Angles and Their Uses

A wide angle lens is generally a lens that has a wider field of view than normal sight. On a full-frame camera, anything under 35mm is often considered wide angle. On a crop-sensor camera, 24mm and under are usually considered wide angle.

So what does this mean? Basically, a wide angle lens gives a wider field of view than a traditional 50mm lens. This means you will capture more in your photo. You also may notice people, objects, and subjects of your photograph look slightly different.

With many wide angle lenses, you may experience a few things. First, some lenses will have bad vignetting at the corners or edges. This is a (often subtle) dimming around the corners. You may also notice distortion, like oversized body parts, uneven horizons, etc. These are fixable in post!

Normal Focal Length
Normal Focal Length
Wide Angle Photograph Sample
Wide Angle

There are many times you can use a wide angle lens. Of course, the most common use is with landscape photography. Whether you’re taking ocean landscapes, cityscapes, or beautiful mountains, you should give it a shot with a wide angle lens.

People also use wide angle and ultra-wide angle lenses for many other things. You can create beautiful architectural photographs, take interesting photos of people, and use your wide angle to capture large groups or events. There’s no one rule on when to use a wide angle lens. Instead, keep it in your bag and play around!

Canon Wide Angle Lens Options

So, you want a wide angle lens. Where do you start? Here we have our favorite wide angle lenses that work with your Canon camera. Please note that prices are approximate, and may change over time.


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1. Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM

Our first lens is made by none other than Canon themselves. With a fixed aperture, this lens works well in low light. It’s a fast lens that many consider to be ultra or extreme wide angle. On a full frame camera, this will definitely be on the wider side!

One reason we love this lens is that the reports of chromatic aberration are very low. There’s realtively little distortion, and solid weather sealing. As a part of the L line of lenses from Canon, you’re getting nothing but the best here. The professional grade glass costs a bit extra.

  • Mount Type: EF
  • Image Stabilization: No
  • Weather Sealing: Yes
  • Weight: 2.6 lbs
  • Cost: $2,699

2. Tamron 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 Di II VC HLD

One of the downsides of buying Canon lenses is the high price tag. If you’re looking for our favorite option at a much more affordable price, check out this new lens from Tamron. This lens is designed for crop sensors specifically, and offers a good wide angle range.

This new an improved lens is a bit pricer than its predecessor, but it has fantastic image stabilization, an autofocus system that rivals the aforementioned Canon lens, and high quality glass. This lens has very little distortion, and is known for being sharp across the entire frame. Furthermore, this lens is about half the weight of the Canon, and about 1/5 of the price!

  • Mount Type: EF-S
  • Image Stabilization: Yes
  • Weather Sealing: Yes
  • Weight: 0.97 lbs
  • Cost: $499

3. Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM

This newer Canon wide angle lens is another favorite, and one we’ve used a bit. With an aperture of 2.8, this is a fast lens that works well in lower lights. The sharpness is on point (punny), and the high-quality glass from Canon does not disappoint. You may notice some normal lens flares, but chromatic aberration and distortion are not likely to be problems.

If you’re an event photographer or wedding photographer, this is our recommendation for you as far as wide angle lenses for Canon cameras go. Although expensive, it works fantastically in low light compared to other wide angles. In addition, there’s internal image stabilization which can help and quality weather sealing.

  • Mount Type: EF
  • Image Stabilization: No
  • Weather Sealing: Yes
  • Weight: 1.4 lbs
  • Cost: $1,999

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4. Sigma 10-22mm f/3.5 EX DC HSM

This Sigma lens is perhaps the best value out there. Especially for those who are on a budget or new to photography, this is a lens worth getting. The photo above of the bridge was taken with this lens. This is a solid lens that will definitely get the job done without causing you to overdraft your bank account.

At a stable f/3.5, this lens isn’t the widest-aperture lens out there. However, the aperture remains stable throughout the zoom range, helping with manual-exposure shooting. The glass has two ELD and an SLD element, providing a clear and sharp image without huge costs. It also has a quiet autofocus, filter thread, and detachable hood. There is some sharpness loss in the corners, and you may notice distortion. We’ve found these to be workable and never a problem when editing in Lightroom.

  • Mount Type: EF-S
  • Image Stabilization: No
  • Weather Sealing: No
  • Weight: 1.15 lbs
  • Cost: $399

5. Tokina AT-X 11-20mm f/2.8 Pro DX

Finally, we have the new Tokina lens. We know many of you may not have even heard of this brand, but they make a solid lens. At an aperture of 2.8, this lens is fast and will work extremely well in low light. Tokina lenses have their one-touch focus clutch mechanism to switch between autofocus and manual focus, which many fans absolutely love.

The Tokina lens for Canon is relatively budget-friendly, offers high image quality, and relatively little distortion. The main draw is the wide aperture, making it a great lens for low-light landscapes and events. It’s especially useful if you want to stop movement in lower light without cranking the ISO up on you camera.

  • Mount Type: EF-S
  • Image Stabilization: No
  • Weather Sealing: No
  • Weight: 1.23 lbs
  • Cost: $399

There’s no perfect lens for everyone. Read through the reviews and thoughts, and choose the one that you think may work best for your needs. For example, if event and low-light photography are your goals, you may want to go with one of the f/2.8 lenses.

On the other hand, if you’re looking for a Canon wide angle lens for landscapes and gnarly weather, you may want to consider the importance of weather sealing. And, of course you want to consider cost and value. Although the expensive pieces are certainly wonderful, do you really need it for you camera in this moment? Only you can answer this!